mikepots83:

Working with new color combinations!


Im loving pink and green combos right now and im thinking of looking for a pink glaze to play with… or maybe a mason stain…

mikepots83:

Working with new color combinations!

Im loving pink and green combos right now and im thinking of looking for a pink glaze to play with… or maybe a mason stain…

Reblogged from pppots
Got a bit of work done this morning!  I’m doing a bunch of stuff that will need to be assembled tomorrow;  some little flower bowls that will get holes poked through the bottom and some olive oil jars for assembling. 
I was going to crank out some small mugs this afternoon but I’m really enjoying trying to make spouts so I might look at making a few teapots!  Gotta figure out what style of teapot to make first…

Got a bit of work done this morning!  I’m doing a bunch of stuff that will need to be assembled tomorrow;  some little flower bowls that will get holes poked through the bottom and some olive oil jars for assembling.

I was going to crank out some small mugs this afternoon but I’m really enjoying trying to make spouts so I might look at making a few teapots!  Gotta figure out what style of teapot to make first…

Holy crap.  I just might be buying a kiln.  Is this really happening?

For the longest time I’ve been talking about how I need a kiln to make my business actually profitable.  My in-laws kind of shrugged it off as something for the future, maybe after I get a real job and make a bit more money.  Their attitude was that, for now, renting someone else’s kiln seemed to be working.

Then I happened to mention to them the other day how much I spent last year (after doing my taxes) to rent a kiln… it was almost the price of a new kiln.  To my amazement,  as soon as I gave them the numbers,  they told me to buy my own kiln.

Not that I need their permission,  but my husband really respects their financial advice.  As soon as they said that he was also on board 100% (where before I think he was a hesitant 80% to spend that amount of money).

So a shopping I will go (good old line of credit is going to get a workout).

stormphyre:

broodqueen:

I’m feelin this

A Steven Hill piece :o

stormphyre:

broodqueen:

I’m feelin this

A Steven Hill piece :o

Reblogged from Mudbug's Workshop
The word “art” is something the West has never understood. Art is supposed to be a part of a community. Like, scholars are supposed to be a part of a community… Art is to decorate people’s houses, their skin, their clothes, to make them expand their minds, and it’s supposed to be right in the community, where they can have it when they want it… It’s supposed to be as essential as a grocery store… that’s the only way art can function naturally.
— Amiri Baraka (via iloverainandcoffee)
Reblogged from CoilPotter
Love these for an underglaze pattern!

Love these for an underglaze pattern!

Reblogged from

samanthaohaverceramics:

can someone take a look at my artist statement and tell me what you think? it’s here below the cut:

Read More

The first paragraph reads great to me, then the second paragraph becomes a little confusing. Maybe condense the second paragraph to be about how you create texture (using various methods) because you want the handling of your work to be an experience.

It seems like your statement would naturally read in 3 paragraphs about; illustration, texture, and a short one on the creative process.

An hour this morning and I’m getting back into it!  
I decided to start simple with some small bowls,  as I haven’t thrown since November.  My inspiration was this little,  rustic bowl from Japan that I’ve been using a lot for cooking.  I want to try to stick to more rustic designs this year.
My problem is that I have so many ideas of things that I want to make,  it’s hard to start out with a full day of making bowls!

An hour this morning and I’m getting back into it! 

I decided to start simple with some small bowls,  as I haven’t thrown since November.  My inspiration was this little,  rustic bowl from Japan that I’ve been using a lot for cooking.  I want to try to stick to more rustic designs this year.

My problem is that I have so many ideas of things that I want to make,  it’s hard to start out with a full day of making bowls!

glazebook:

258. Rutile Blue (^6 oxidation)
80 Alberta Slip20 Ferro Frit 31344 Rutile

glazebook:

258. Rutile Blue (^6 oxidation)

80 Alberta Slip
20 Ferro Frit 3134
4 Rutile

Reblogged from Glaze Book
Just a reminder of where I was working last summer…

Just a reminder of where I was working last summer…

One view of the main pottery studio.  Work bench on the right for wedging,  wheel by the window.  A drop sink is across the hall in the laundry room.  There’s a cement area that used to have a fireplace (out of view) that would be PERFECT for a kiln…. some day, sigh.
Moving up in the world from the rotten garden shed I was working in last summer!

One view of the main pottery studio.  Work bench on the right for wedging,  wheel by the window.  A drop sink is across the hall in the laundry room.  There’s a cement area that used to have a fireplace (out of view) that would be PERFECT for a kiln…. some day, sigh.

Moving up in the world from the rotten garden shed I was working in last summer!

Tags: pottery studio
My small glaze room!  Now I’ll actually have a space to start mixing my own glazes - eeeep!  What you can’t see in the picture is a tap (the room has running water but no sink) and a door I can open for better ventilation.  Now I need to start getting glaze supplies.

My small glaze room!  Now I’ll actually have a space to start mixing my own glazes - eeeep!  What you can’t see in the picture is a tap (the room has running water but no sink) and a door I can open for better ventilation.  Now I need to start getting glaze supplies.

glazebook:

257. Burke’s Strong Celadon (^6 oxidation)
58 Custer Feldspar17 Whiting14 Flint6 OM-4 Ball Clay5 Zinc Oxide1 Copper Carbonate

glazebook:

257. Burke’s Strong Celadon (^6 oxidation)

58 Custer Feldspar
17 Whiting
14 Flint
6 OM-4 Ball Clay
5 Zinc Oxide
1 Copper Carbonate

Reblogged from Glaze Book